I'm Kristin Ang, and I'm running for Port of Tacoma Commissioner (Pos. 4). I never thought I would enter politics, but as the saying goes, "If you see something, say something, do something." When the world's largest methanol plant was to be built at the Port of Tacoma, I was stunned. The plant would have used 3 billion gallons of our water per year and increased pollution here, simply to help China manufacture more plastic. Other two methanol plants are being built in an area in Louisiana called "Cancer Alley."  Pierce County can have a better vision. Thankfully, public outcry stopped the methanol project.

The Port of Tacoma has incredible potential to bring economic growth, development and family-wage jobs to Pierce County. To fulfill its potential, the Port must modernize. The Port must also move forward from its toxic legacy. It is time to thrive in the 21st century with environmental stewardship and sustainability.

 

 

It was you the People of Pierce County who stopped the methanol project, you who defend our way of life, and you who give back to our communities, that inspired me to run. Our country is calling every one of us to serve and be the change we wish to see.

So, I'm running – running hard to be worthy to serve as your commissioner and represent your voices.

I was awarded a piano and academic scholarship to attend the University of Puget Sound, where I earned my business degree. I obtained my law degree from Cornell Law School. I had the opportunity to study international business and law in mainland China and experienced firsthand its heavy pollution. While attending the University of Hong Kong, I worked at the U.S. Commercial Service, the trade promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. I spent time at the Clean Energy Group in Vermont, a leading national non-profit working on innovative policy, technology and finance programs in the areas of clean energy and climate change. These experiences shaped me. They have helped me truly appreciate the beauty, quality of life, and natural resources of the Pacific Northwest. That environmental and economic well-being go hand in hand.

Pierce County is special. Our geography and natural resources give us advantages. We are primed to rise if we make good decisions. As the economic engine of Pierce County, the decisions made by the Port Commission impact the economy and our environment at both the local and global level. These decisions must include the citizens. The People must be made aware, informed, and consulted. Let the People have a say with what happens to public lands and public money.

These are the years that will define us. The decisions we make today will determine our destiny. As the Port celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2018, I welcome you the People of Pierce County to help decide who we are and shape the vision of our future.

 

Kristin Ang

Kristin Ang